Good Suburbs Guide

Good Suburbs guide

This book is now out of print as the statistics about median price and rentals are out of date. This ambitious book had original copy about every suburb in Sydney, and from memory there were more than 2000 of them. It took a loooooooong time to write and co-authors had to be brought in to complete it. The objective was to provide comprehensive data and suburb descriptions for every suburb in Sydney. I don’t think I’ve ever visited so many places I had never heard of until I contributed to writing this book …

I created the suggested format for each suburb profile and Australian Property Monitors provided all the data on prices and average growth, which the writers had to put into context.

Paddington

The chocolate box terraces of Paddington are famous for once housing slums that somehow turning into million-dollar pied a terres – don’t you love real estate mythology? The gentrification of this fantastically located suburb smack bang between the CBD and some of the best beaches Sydney has to offer has made Paddington a real estate legend. The suburb is famous for its hip shopping strip, perhaps somewhat deflated by nearby Westfield Bondi Junction’s recent offering, and the Saturday markets at the local primary school on Oxford Street. It’s a strictly precinct affair in Paddo – Five Ways is not the same as the quieter and car-less “Art college end”, which is not the same as the “best streets” close to Woollahra. Choose the part you like the best, and pay the price.

What it costs to buy

  • June 2007 Median House Price: $1.152,000
  • Lowest to highest: $146,000 to $4,830,000
  • June 2007 Median Apartment Price: $595,000
  • Lowest to highest: $185,000-$1,100,000

Average growth in past 10 years 7.5%

What it costs to rent

  • June 2007 average 3-bed house rent: $460
  • Lowest to highest: $210 to $6,800pw
  • June 2007 average apartment rent: $400pw
  • Lowest to highest: $180 to $950pw

What’s in the area: Train Station:3 Restaurant:50+ Golf Course:1 Police:2 Hospital:9 School/College:17 Post Office:8 Fast Food:50+ Cafe:50+ Chemist:50+

Distance to the CBD: 4km

And … those Paddington terrace have a reputation for being chomped by termites so make sure you check the metre-box of each house and apartment to check what pest treatments have already occurred.

Campsie

Campsie’s housing styles are as eclectic as the goods on offer on Beamish Street, the main shopping drag. This suburb has wide streets dotted with modest 1920s bungalows often cheek-by-jowl with apartments. One of Sydney’s liveliest centres, Campsie bustles with good, cheap restaurants and has a similar vibe to Marrickville fifteen years ago. There are some lovely tree-lined streets, especially close to the Cooks River in what’s known as “the numbers avenues” – first, second, third, fourth and fifth avenues. Real estate here is still affordable and some of the older-style houses are still untouched and waiting for an eager renovator to snap them up.

What it costs to buy

  • June 2007 Median House Price: $460,000
  • Lowest to highest: $210,000 to $1,220,000
  • June 2007 Median Apartment Price: $250,000
  • Lowest to highest: $108,000-$1,038,000

Average growth in past 10 years 7.5%

What it costs to rent

  • June 2007 average 3-bed house rent: $300pw
  • Lowest to highest: $250-$750pw
  • June 2007 average apartment rent: $180pw
  • Lowest to highest: $130-$450pw

What’s in the area

Train Station:3 Restaurant:25 Police:2 Hospital:1 Post Office:9 School/College:16 Fast Food:30 Cafe:8 Bank:1 Chemist:26

Distance to the CBD:

And … Campsie is on the Bankstown train line and has express trains that take 20 minutes to travel into Central during peak hour.

 

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